Critical Perspectives in Technology Electives (CPT)

Critical Perspectives in Technology Electives (CPT) are courses that will develop vocabularies, theoretical perspectives, and critical approaches relevant to technology. The fundamental goal of these courses is to develop a critical awareness of how technology impacts culture and society. These courses which work as electives for both the Bachelor of Science in TAM as well as the Minor in TAM, will challenge students to think critically about the effects of technology across a broad range of disciplines, perspectives and methodologies.

Students in the BS-TAM program are required to complete a total of 12 credit hours, including 6 credits of upper division coursework, as Critical Perspectives in Technology electives. These 12 credits are to be selected from the list of accepted courses found below. Students may also contact the TAM Academic Advisor to request consideration of additional courses to be accepted as Critical Perspectives in Technology elective classes.

Courses marked with an asterisk* are accepted Critical Perspectives in Technology Electives for the TAM Minor and the BS TAM.

APRD 3301, Social Media Strategies*

Emphasis on how social media and internet marketing influence public relations; understand the fundamentals and best practices in social media management, visual communication and mobile applications. Requires a prerequisite course of APRD 2002 (minimum grade D-). Restricted Strategic Communication (STCM) majors only.

ARCH 3214, History & Theory Architecture 2*

Surveys architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design from A.D. 1400 to the present, emphasizing developments in the Western world. Open to nonmajors on a space available basis.

ARTH 3109, Art in Contemporary Society*

Examines writings by philosophers and art critics as they address the question: What is art for? Readings focus on the 19th and 20th centuries, including current theories and some non-Western theories. Students are encouraged to develop their own responses to the question. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and ARTH 1400. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: critical thinking.

ARTH 3719, History of Media Arts*

Surveys the development of technological media both as sources of information and as art. Photography and related media, film, video, holography, and electronic imaging systems are surveyed as art and as technologies, emphasizing major artists, movements, exhibitions, and other productions in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and ARTH 1400.

ARTS 3236-3, Electronic Arts Survey*
ARTS 4316, History & Theory of Digital Art*

Explores the history and theory of digital art. Discussion topics include the emergence of Internet art, hypertext, new media theory, on-line exhibitions, web publishing, virtual reality, and the networked interface. Includes collaborative and individual projects. Prereqs., ARTS 2126 or instructor consent.

ATLS 1240/CSCI 1240, The Computational World

Introduces and explores the "computational style of thinking" and its influence in science, mathematics, engineering and the arts. The course does not focus on the nuts and bolts of any particular programming language, but rather on the way in which computing has affected human culture and thought in the past half century.

ATLS 2036/ENGL 2036, Introduction to Media Studies in the Humanities

Serves as an introduction to media studies, including theories and methodologies for undertaking media scholarship within the humanities. Topics may include the history of the book, text messaging, blogging, and gaming, as well as digital fiction and poetry. Same as ATLS 2036.

ATLS 3519, History of Design

Surveys design through historical, ideological, stylistic, and technological contexts, examining design’s relationship to significant political, philosophical, and cultural events. While the primary focus of the course is graphic design, lectures will span myriad disciplines including architecture, textile design, fashion design, interior design, product design, and fine art.

ATLS 4230: Case Studies in Information & Communication Technology for Development*

ICTD Case Studies will examine the evolving field of Information and Communication Technologies for Development through the lens of successful (and not so successful) development projects, policies, and technologies. In addition to selecting, reading and analyzing a variety of case studies covering a broad spectrum of ICTD sectors, students will have the opportunity to implement and experiment with the various technologies and platforms discussed. These hands-on class sessions will be interspersed with student presentations and lively discussions around best practices, implementation strategies, and technology's role(s) in development. At the end of this class, students should be knowledgeable about past and present ICTD projects, what general project characteristics correlate with success/failure, and a hands-on understanding of several technology platforms.

ATLS 4519, Technology and the Young
CMCI 1010-3, Concepts and Creativity 1: Media, Communication, Information
CMDP 1400-3, Introduction to Contemporary Media Cultures
CMDP 2100-3, Approaches to Historical Media Practices
CMDP 2810-3, Documentary Media Poetics
CMDP 3450-3, Critical Perspectives in Media Practices
CSCI 1240-3, The Computational World
CSCI 3002-3, HCC Foundations/User-Centered Design and Development 1
CSCI 3702-3, Cognitive Science*

Introduces cognitive science, drawing from psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and linguistics. Studies the linguistic relativity hypothesis, consciousness, categorization, linguistic rules, the mind-body problem, nature versus nurture, conceptual structure and metaphor, logic/problem solving and judgment. Emphasizes the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind. Department enforced prereqs., two of the following: PSYC 2145, LING 2000, CSCI 1300, and PHIL 2440. Same as LING 3005, PHIL 3310, and PSYC 3005.

COMM 3610, Communication, Technology & Society*

Presents theory, research, and exploration into computer-based technologies; studies implications for communication, interaction, and social relationships. Recommended prereq., COMM 1210.

EDUC 3570, Learning with Technology In and Out of School*

Examines ways digital media are changing the way young people learn, play, make friends, and participate in civic life. Studies widely implemented digital tools intended to support literary, math, and science learning of children ages 4-18. Involves brief internship (5 hours outside class) and design projects that integrate these tools to transform in either a classroom or after-school program.

ENGL 2036/ATLS 2036, Introduction to Media Studies in the Humanities

Serves as an introduction to media studies, including theories and methodologies for undertaking media scholarship within the humanities. Topics may include the history of the book, text messaging, blogging, and gaming, as well as digital fiction and poetry. Same as ATLS 2036.

ENVD 3002, Design Theory & Methods*

The nature of design and systematic methods for improving design. Topics include: nature of design problems; structure of design process; theory of form; problem definition; generating solution ideas; evaluation; roles of form and function. Students use computers without having to learn to program. Open to non-majors.

ENVD 4314, Architectural Theory*

Surveys, through lectures and readings, the major historical developments and contemporary directions in architectural theory. Prereqs., ARCH 3114. Restricted to ENVD students.

ENVS 3032-3, Environment, Media & Society*

Examines how mass media influence our society, specifically with regard to environmental issues and outcomes. Focuses on media influence over environmental politics and policy, environmental public opinion, popular culture, and environmental/scientific knowledge. Fulfills intermediate social science requirement for Environmental Studies major. Prereq., ENVS 1000.

FILM 3104, Film Criticism & Theory*

Surveys the range and function of film criticism, introduces major positions and concepts of film theory, and focuses on students' abilities to write about film. Prereq., FILM 1502. Same as HUMN 3104.

FILM 3603, Sound & Vision*

Historical and aesthetic overview of sound in relation to film, ranging from Hitchcock's Blackmail to Mailick's The Thin Red Line. Pursues issues in sound design, mixing film scores, voiceovers, and film/sound theory in narrative, experimental, and documentary films. Among the filmmakers to be studied are Vertov, Welles, Altman, Brakhage, Lipsett, Eisenstein, Coppola, Scorcese, Stone, Leone, Godard, Nelson. Also explores a limited practicum using Pro Tools for sound design. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051.

FYSM 1000-029, ID/Representation in the Digital Age
LIBB 1700-3, The History of Communication from Caves to Cyberspace

Surveys the history, evolution, and nature of communication and communication technologies. Students learn about the ongoing media revolution and its broader context, considering the interdependence of communication, culture, and society. They critically examine utopian, deterministic, and pessimistic arguments about the influence of new technologies and arts. Course combines lecture, discussion, and group work in a seminar format. Restricted to Libby RAP students. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

LING 3005-3, Cognitive Science*

Introduces cognitive science, drawing from psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and linguistics. Studies the linguistic relativity hypothesis, consciousness, categorization, linguistic rules, the mind-body problem, nature versus nurture, conceptual structure and metaphor, logic/problem solving and judgment. Emphasizes the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind. Department enforced prereqs., two of the following: PSYC 2145, LING 2000, CSCI 1300, and PHIL 2440. Same as CSCI 3702-3, PHIL 3310, and PSYC 3005.

MDST 3002: Digital Culture & Politics

Examines issues at the intersection of digital media, culture and politics, such as regulation and network architecture, piracy and hacking, and grassroots activism. Engage with a range of theories about cultural politics, democracy, liberalism and neo-liberalism in relation to digital information and communication technologies.

MDST 3201-3, Media, Culture & Globalization*

Surveys the political and economic structures of media system in developed and developing countries and discusses the impact of privatization, ownership consolidation, and globalization on the flow of information across national borders. Also looks at how global media flows and counter-flows affect conceptions of nationhood and cultural identity. Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Junior or Senior) College of Media, Communication, and Information (CMCI) or Program in Journalism & Mass Communication (JOUR) or International Affairs (IAFS) majors only.

MDST 3321-3, Media Industries & Economics*

Focuses on the institutions and practices of the media industries. Surveys the histories, structures, and activities of these organizations and the contemporary issues surrounding them. Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Junior or Senior) College of Media, Communication, and Information (CMCIU) or Program in Journalism & Mass Communication (JOURU) majors only.

MDST 3791-3, Media and the Public*

Provides an overview of how publishing in print and electronic forms has been tied closely to democratic ideals for centuries. Explores how the idea of the public is central to the theory and practice of media politics, and how the contested concepts of "the public sphere" and "public opinion" have long been linked to debates about the proper relationship between media and democratic citizenship. Restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Junior or Senior) College of Media, Communication, and Information (CMCIU) or Program in Journalism & Mass Communication (JOURU) majors only.

MDST 4371-3 Media & Religion

Examines the way religion uses media as a social and political force. Introduces the major themes and trends in the mediation of religion and the religious inflection of the media in professional, popular, and emerging media contexts.

MGMT 4210, Systems Thinking*

Analysis of systems thinking and understanding the complex interactions of collections of people, processes, organizations, and technologies. Students learn to be creative and critical thinkers who can conceptually model the very complex systems we encounter in our world today. Prereqs., BCOR 2500 and 52 hours completed.

PHIL 3310-3, Cognitive Science*

Introduces cognitive science, drawing from psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and linguistics. Studies the linguistic relativity hypothesis, consciousness, categorization, linguistic rules, the mind-body problem, nature versus nurture, conceptual structure and metaphor, logic/problem solving and judgment. Emphasizes the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind. Department enforced prereqs., two of the following: PSYC 2145, LING 2000, CSCI 1300, and PHIL 2440. Same as CSCI 3702-3, LING 3005, and PSYC 3005.

PSYC 3005-3, Cognitive Science*

Introduces cognitive science, drawing from psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and linguistics. Studies the linguistic relativity hypothesis, consciousness, categorization, linguistic rules, the mind-body problem, nature versus nurture, conceptual structure and metaphor, logic/problem solving and judgment. Emphasizes the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind. Department enforced prereqs., two of the following: PSYC 2145, LING 2000, CSCI 1300, and PHIL 2440. Same as CSCI 3702-3, LING 3005, and PHIL 3310.

MGMT 4230, Design of Usable Business Systems*

Focuses on the usefulness and usability of systems in organizations. Examines the bottom line implications of information systems and how to create systems that are easy to use for all potential users. Creative and critical thinking to design and build systems are stressed through individual and team exercises. Prereq., BCOR 2500 and 52 hours completed.

RLST 1850, Ritual and Media

Ritual continues to play an important role in contemporary societies in both religious and secular contexts. This course examines the elements and genres of ritual activity from African rites of passage to the Beijing Olympics, playing close attention to how the media documents, appropriates and transforms aspects of ritual. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: Contemporary Societies.

WRTG 3020, New Media & Civic Engagement*

In 2008 when Barack Obama was elected as the President of the United States, he had over 2.5 million Facebook supporters, more than four times that of his opponents (Aaker 16); this is one of many illustrations of how new media, specifically social media, has altered public involvement and civic engagement as well as modes of circulation and composition. This course will focus on intersections between civic engagement and new media with topics such as: new media literacies, digital ethics, collective identity, digital tools for composition and research, civic participation, transparency of media, and authority in digital realms. In exploring these issues students will generate both scholarly and digital-based creative work throughout three main projects, which include: a new media remix of a political text and a corresponding essay; data collection from online sources, a multimedia presentation and written analysis; and a curation of a digital archive and composition of a paper on the civic and political affects of this archival project. This course is meant to develop students' writing skills as well as rhetorical analysis, research skills and understanding of academic writing. Each week is organized around a general topic with specific readings to which we will apply theoretical concepts and rhetorical analysis through assignments, in class exercises and discussions.

WRTG 3020, Technology & American Culture*

This course proceeds from the fundamental understanding that we are in the midst of an apparatus shift beyond literacy toward an emerging paradigm of "electracy," as theorized by Gregory L. Ulmer. Ulmer explains that Electracy "is to digital media what literacy is to alphabetic writing: an apparatus, or social machine, partly technological, partly institutional " (Networked 2009). The effects of this shift impact not only communication and identity formation, but cultural forms and perhaps academic practices as well. One goal of this course is to examine closely the technological transitions already familiar to us in network society and contemporary culture—with new developments and potential for digital rhetoric and multimodal composition. A second part to this premise is that whereas the prior "television age" involved audiences’ passively receiving the dominant culture as "consumers," the network age situates us in a participatory role regarding information, media, and discourse. We will explore the rhetorical implications of this on-going shift, with students and "audience members" becoming contributors and not just receiver-consumers of culture and discourse. Note: topic and specific culture form will vary by semester.

WRTG 3020, Gender, Sexuality & New Media*

We will investigate a variety of claims made about gender, sexuality and relationships, including competing claims made by scientists and social constructionists. We will examine the assumptions and values on which these claims are based and we will evaluate the validity of the reasoning, evidence and rhetorical devices used to support them. You will write several short analytical papers in response to readings and documentaries about related issues, such as gender roles, transsexual and intersexidentities, alternatives to monogamy, and the marriage movement. You will also complete a course project in which you develop and defend a sustained critique of a particular essay. A variety of homework assignments and in-class activities will help you improve the skills you need to successfully complete these assignments. This course will also further strengthen your skills in reading critically, composing strong paragraphs, evaluating and using outside sources, targeting specific audiences, revising for clarity and conciseness, and editing for publication.

WRTG 3020, Comics & the Graphic Novel
WRTG 3020, Changing Digital Communities